News

The UNG chapter of UCWGA has written an open letter to President Jacobs urging stronger protections for the campus community including expanding online learning and free, frequent, and accurate COV

On Friday, August 28, 2020, the Georgia College & State University (GCSU) chapter of the United Campus Workers of Georgia (UCWGA) held our first direct action at our school’s “Public Forum Area,” with approximately 40 participants. We organized a die-in protest to urge GC’s administration and the University System of Georgia (USG) Board of Regents to listen to our demands to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19 on our campus, including choice in online working and learning options, free on-campus testing, quarantine housing for students, hazard pay for frontline staff, and no layoffs in the event of campus closure. 

With the fall semester set to resume on August 20, UGA’s reopening plans are still inadequate and ultimately imperil students, workers, the Athens community, and citizens of Georgia.

We had a successful Fair Wage picnic on May 1, 2019, thanks to the UGA employees, artists, and to our gracious sponsors! We look forward to this becoming an annual event.

May 1, 2019  Building on years of prior work by the Economic Justice Coalition, efforts this year by United Campus Workers of Georgia and a coalition of community partners have resulted in real progress, as UGA President Gere Morehead announced a wage increase of about 2.8% for the institution’s lowest paid workers.

UCWGA fights for the freedom of speech for all university workers. We expect the University of Georgia to do the same. Read our letter to President Morehead signed by 126 faculty, staff, students, and community members.

https://flagpole.com/news/news-features/2018/09/26/even-after-compromise-uga-grad-students-say-insurance-spike-is-still-too-high

Courtney Balling had misgivings when she was considering leaving Vermont to enroll in the University of Georgia’s crop and soil graduate program. "I was warned against moving back to Georgia because we'd probably pay more for our health insurance or lose it,” she said. “That was the case."